http://www.rosehavencottage.com Mon, 07 Dec 2020 16:56:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.1 Logos of the Top 100 Companies Update http://www.rosehavencottage.com/logos-of-the-top-100-companies-update/ http://www.rosehavencottage.com/logos-of-the-top-100-companies-update/#respond Mon, 07 Dec 2020 16:27:00 +0000 http://www.rosehavencottage.com/?p=4048 Corporate ranking on Fortune magazine’s list of the top 500 companies based on financial performance changes every year. Companies move up and down. Sometimes a little. Sometimes a lot. In 2016, in a bid to explore the correlation between excellence in brand identity and corporate performance, we posted a chart of the logos of the […]

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Corporate ranking on Fortune magazine’s list of the top 500 companies based on financial performance changes every year. Companies move up and down. Sometimes a little. Sometimes a lot. In 2016, in a bid to explore the correlation between excellence in brand identity and corporate performance, we posted a chart of the logos of the top 100 companies on Fortune’s list. In this update, we look at something else. How many companies still in the top 100 have changed their identities? Are the changes major or minor? Tweaks, evolution or extreme makeover? As with the original inquiry, there were many surprises. Would you believe over a quarter of the companies from the original list that are still in the top 100 have implemented brand identity updates? If you consider there are 11 new companies on the list it’s closer to 30% of the companies still on the list in 2020.

The companies that have made changes to their brand identities are highlighted below in a series of categories. The new logos are on the right. Included with each is their change in rank.

Tinker and Tweak

If you look at the brand identities of many storied companies you will see minor changes in their logos over time. Each a simple, modest improvement.

American Express is a great example of small steps forward. Many wouldn’t even notice the changes unless they looked at the two logos side-bye-side. On trend, the shine is off. The new logo is a solid, deeper blue. But look closer at the letters R, X and S. The refinements to these characters plus spacing adjustments make the name more easily readable. +18

 

Online presence is extremely important. Someone must have noticed that the spaces in Bank of America’s logo and logotype closed up in small sizes on a web page. That’s a guess not insider information. The new spacing solves that problem. Also helpful are the shift to all caps and higher contrast between the colours. +1

 

AT&T turned a negative into a positive. Basically, they flipped the colours in their logo. What was blue is now white and what was white is now blue. Not sure about the reasoning. Perhaps it was necessary when they removed the transparent dimensional effect. Still, the identity is well maintained. The switch to upper case for the initials signals more authority in an extremely competitive industry. +1

 

Most minimal tweak goes to Wells Fargo. The new typeface is more modern and less extended. The narrower type allows the name to be slightly larger in the square. But who’s going to notice unless something more obvious like the colour changes. Out with yellow. -3

 

Sometimes you look at a branding update and wonder which is the new and improved. Such is the case with Valero Energy. They’ve shifted to a more generic blue, changed the name to U/L? case and tweaked the squiggle. What is that squiggle? An “e”? A pipeline? Maybe they’ll drop it next time. 0

 

Evolutionary

Slightly more than a tweak, an evolutionary approach to a brand identity updates takes a significant step forward while maintaining visual cues to the previous version.

Intel is a good example. They dropped the dated orbiting oval from their logo but maintained a similarity in typeface update. Notice the “t”. The name is stronger in black with the blue dot maintaining a connection in their colour palette. +6

 

Citigroup simplified their identity by reducing their name in their logo to just Citi. They also pared their iconic umbrella down to arc and made it a more integral element in the design.? -2

 

This was a pretty extreme change for Best Buy but still within the range of evolution. The elements are maintained but rearranged. The type is more corporate—a progression. Reducing their familiar yellow may be a first step in eliminating it entirely. Sans the black outline on the tag the yellow doesn’t read well against white but it is typically used on a blue field which does work. -4

 

It’s back to the future for MetLife. As Metropolitan Life, their identity included a symbol based on four connected Ms. They dropped the symbol and shortened their name to MetLife in 1998. Since our last review MetLife has returned with a new symbol and friendlier typeface. The intersecting elements of the new M symbol softens the company’s identity and expands their brand colour palette. -8

 

ADM’s previous logo looks like something between clip art and what you can expect from a designer on Fiverr. They’ve turned over a new leaf and added a trendy gradient. Better? -13

 

They may have maintained the positioning of their typographic elements but what a big step forward for HCA. This update moves from poorly set and matched type to a professional looking identity. It’s challenging to produce a unique take on something as common as a medical cross. This succeeds in that regard. -2

 

It would have been easy for Kroger to simply flatten their 3D logo. They went significantly further. Oval? Gone. Red? Gone. Still, this is more evolution than revolution. The type design concept remains. You might even see a smiling face in the “og” combination now. -6

 

Flattering

Few graphic design trends have been as ubiquitous as moving to flat colour. These companies have jumped on the brandwagon. No further comments required.

GM -10

 

Ford -3

 

John Deere +13

 

UPS +5

 

Swimming against the current is P&G. -16

 

The Blues

Blues, moody or otherwise dominate branding. Over 60% of the companies in the top 100 have blue in their logo.

AIG wants a blue logo. They’re just having a hard time deciding which blue. -17

 

What American company drops the colors of their flag? For Cisco, the water must have looked bluer on the other side of the bridge. +9

 

Corplay

Mergers and acquisitions. Few things mess up brand identity like trying to blend distinct corporate entities. Especially when combining brand identities is part of the deal. Occasionally it works out..eventually.

StoneX Group. Not sure what the X represents but that’s so much simpler than INTL-FCStone. -17

 

“Created when United Technologies merged its aerospace units Pratt & Whitney and Collins Aerospace with the Raytheon Company…the new Raytheon Technologies enters the Fortune 500 six places higher than United Technologies alone last year. ” (Fortune) The companies share familial branding but why are they different at all?

 

Extreme Makeover

When it comes to rebranding, some companies throw the baby out with the bathwater. The following are the most extreme brand identity makeovers. Their communities and stakeholders could be excused for not recognizing them.

Next to flattening, the next most popular trend in updates is blanding—reducing your brand identity to a simple sans serif wordmark. The best example on the chart is UnitedHealth Group. -1

 

Another symbol dropped. Say goodbye to the classic Chase logo designed by Thomas Geismar. Perhaps it was time to bid the past goodbye and establish the brand as new. Serif type is the new wave. +6

 

The old MassMutual logo brings to mind another M word. Mundane. No loss here. MassMutual moved in a completely opposite direction with this update. Their square replaced by a grouping of circles (is that an M?). A bold sans usurps the former serif typeface. -13

 

Although the elements of the Fannie Mae identity have evolved, the visual break in colour and style is significant. The new branding appears to target a younger market. -8

 

Perhaps the greatest departure from the past is this new logo for Tyson Foods. Fortunately, this logo is only used at the corporate level. The oval logo—which has seen several updates—continues to represent the company in the consumer marketplace. -13

 

The Newbies

The new kids on the block and their ranking. Dell 34, Centene 42, Facebook 46, Albertsons 55, Charter 71, TechData 90, USAA 94, Northrop Grumman 96, Capital One 97, Plains GP Holdings 98, Abbvie 99.

 

The Dropouts

No longer in the top 100. Listed here with there 2016 rank. Express Scripts 22, Aetna 46, Ingram 64, Johnson Controls 70, CHS 84, Gilead 86, 3M 93, Mondelez 94, 21st Century Fox 96, Tesoro 98, TimeWarner 99, Northwestern Mutual 100.

 

Are there conclusions to be drawn from the impact of brand identity updates on corporate performance? Not really. There is no evidence of consistent gains or losses based on change. Some observations. A few of the companies that made the greatest changes suffered the biggest drops. MassMutual and Tyson are both down 13 positions. The biggest gain was by American Express with its subtle but well-crafted update.

Leading companies take branding seriously and most change with the times. Overall, the top 100 companies are represented with solid brand identities. Most of the companies joining the list look like they belong. As do the dropouts. Great branding does not guarantee financial success. But it does inspire confidence.

Related:

Logos of the Top 100 Companies

The Square Route of a Logo

Branding as the Marketing Strategy

When Brands Grow Up

Starbucks Logo Change

 

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Brand Identity Design Showreel http://www.rosehavencottage.com/brand-identity-design-showreel/ http://www.rosehavencottage.com/brand-identity-design-showreel/#respond Fri, 15 Feb 2019 20:00:04 +0000 http://www.rosehavencottage.com/?p=3932 This video features a collection of Brand Identity Designs by Public Image Design. We craft identities as unique as the brands they represent. Take a look.       Related videos: Branding as the Marketing Strategy 2015 Project Review Showreel

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This video features a collection of Brand Identity Designs by Public Image Design. We craft identities as unique as the brands they represent. Take a look.

 

 

 

Related videos:

Branding as the Marketing Strategy

2015 Project Review Showreel

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Logos Beyond Words http://www.rosehavencottage.com/logos-beyond-words/ http://www.rosehavencottage.com/logos-beyond-words/#respond Thu, 17 Jan 2019 18:22:17 +0000 http://www.rosehavencottage.com/?p=3911 Mastercard has removed its name from their logo. They likely planned to do so as part of a branding update in 2016 when they simplified their intersecting circles design and moved the name from inside the logo to below it. Now their famous circles stand alone as the company’s brand identity. Name dropping isn’t a […]

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Mastercard has removed its name from their logo. They likely planned to do so as part of a branding update in 2016 when they simplified their intersecting circles design and moved the name from inside the logo to below it. Now their famous circles stand alone as the company’s brand identity.

Name dropping isn’t a unique move among well known international brands. Nike and Starbucks have previously done the same. I wrote about the strategic reasons for the Starbucks logo update when they dropped Starbucks Coffee from their logo and focused on their famous siren. A symbol without words can transcend language and culture in global markets.

 

Starbucks and Nike Logo rebranding

 

Mastercard did their research. Globally, over 80% of consumers recognize their logo from the circles alone. Certainly their card carrying customers would. Seeing the logo alone with a quick glance at a web page or shop window would quickly assure them that Mastercard would be accepted for their payment.

This level of logo recognition takes years of consistent brand identity strategy. The intersecting red and gold circles have changed very little since 1968 when the company was known as Master Charge. The name was changed to MasterCard in 1979. They have chosen evolution over revolution in their progressive updates since.

 

Mastercard logos rebrand

 

Logo recognition is a sign of connection with your brand’s community. You don’t have to be a large international company to achieve similar success with your own identity. With consistent usage in communication your logo will become known to those most exposed to your organization. The means of exposure can be as simple as your stationery, signage, vehicles, email signature or social media icon. Think about how quickly you recognize identities from those tiny squares on your phone.

The two constants of logos that promote visual retention are simplicity and consistent presentation. Simplicity allows faster recognition of a symbol. How long would it take you to identify Nike’s swoosh or the Apple logo? Equally important is consistency in the way a logo is used. Most organizations that have invested in professional identity design have brand standards that dictate positioning, fonts and colours.

Unlike Mastercard, your logo alone may not identify your organization outside the scope of those you communicate with. However, with proper implementation it will quickly identify your message and assets to those who exposed to them.

 

Related posts:

Starbucks Coffee Logo Change – Grande Bold!

When Brands Grow Up

 

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Branding that Rocks http://www.rosehavencottage.com/branding-that-rocks/ http://www.rosehavencottage.com/branding-that-rocks/#respond Wed, 18 Jul 2018 20:09:26 +0000 http://www.rosehavencottage.com/?p=3799 Branding is complicated. Creating brand identity for an organization typically requires a great deal of research and discussion. Before pencil hits paper or a mouse is clicked, a thorough understanding of a clients needs and objectives is required. Beyond the internal perspective, their markets need to be reviewed and their customer response evaluated. In the […]

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Branding is complicated. Creating brand identity for an organization typically requires a great deal of research and discussion. Before pencil hits paper or a mouse is clicked, a thorough understanding of a clients needs and objectives is required. Beyond the internal perspective, their markets need to be reviewed and their customer response evaluated.

In the case of Greystone Restoration & Construction, I could skip these steps. I am their customer. My neighbors are their customers. I have worked through several projects with them and know their work ethic and commitment to quality.

The name Greystone gave me an opportunity to explore branding beyond the typical house or tool logos used by most contractors. Branding doesn’t always need to be a symbol or wordmark. Sometimes a colour, style or consistency of imagery can define a brand’s identity. Ever seen an ad for the first time and know which brand it’s from before noting their name or logo?

Greystone Website home page

I run on the boardwalk in Toronto several times each week. Occasionally I come across a spot where rocks have been stacked and balanced in near impossible configurations. This was the inspiration for the Greystone branding. The rocks at the beach were stacked, often knocked down and restacked in new compositions. I photographed the new structures as they appeared for several weeks, looking for ones that expressed construction as a balance of form and aesthetic. The intent is to use several different ones over time.

Rock stacks at the beach.

Successful branding is unique and memorable. I’ve written before about “the one with” factor. Greystone has that. They are the one with the stacked rocks – on their signs, their business cards and on their website. They are different and that is demonstrated in their branding.

 

Website: greystonegta.com

Related:

Branding as the marketing strategy.

 

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2017 Logo Update – A Capital Idea http://www.rosehavencottage.com/2017-logo-update-a-capital-idea/ http://www.rosehavencottage.com/2017-logo-update-a-capital-idea/#respond Tue, 25 Apr 2017 14:59:36 +0000 http://www.rosehavencottage.com/?p=3656 There are trends in all types of design whether you’re talking about fashion, furnishings or the auto industry. Logo design is no different. Brands need to be current and many will jump on a trend with logo updates. Numerous companies have flattened their colours and eliminated dimension from their marks in recent years. The results […]

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There are trends in all types of design whether you’re talking about fashion, furnishings or the auto industry. Logo design is no different. Brands need to be current and many will jump on a trend with logo updates. Numerous companies have flattened their colours and eliminated dimension from their marks in recent years. The results are not always an improvement. Change for the sake of trend.

I read many articles on trends in logo design. Few are earth shattering. But occasionally there are shifts in A versus B choices that stand out.

In 2008, Walmart startled the branding world with a new logo that presented the company name in upper and lowercase type. It was a sharp contrast to their previous bold caps version. And it was right for the time. Social media was exploding. In the #ALLCAPSBAD world of Facebook and Twitter, the new logo came across as less imposing and more friendly and conversational.

walmart logo update image

Other major brands followed suit including Kraft and Xerox. Each going as far as using no caps at all. An approach common in the online world of Amazon, Facebook and Twitter. But it didn’t work for every brand (ahem, Gap).

kraft and xerox logo images

It’s interesting to note that of the top 100 brands that incorporate their company name as all or part of their their primary brand identity (excluding initials), over 50% use lowercase letters. Only 33% use all caps.

This is not to say that there is a right or wrong choice in typeface case. Simply that it often follows trends. In fact, the reason I’m writing this is because I was shocked earlier this year when Calvin Klein updated their iconic logo with a switch to capital letters. And today I’m reading all caps is the new design trend for 2017.

calvin klein logo update image

Personally, I don’t follow trends in my design work. That’s a path to early obsolescence in my mind. Especially when it comes to type selection. Type has personality. Choice of upper or lowercase, serif, sans serif or script should reflect an appropriate expression of character. I review thousands of possible type solutions in both upper and lowercase for every brand or packaging assignment I work on. Final choices are meant to last. Not just to capitalize on the latest trends.

Related:

When Brands Grow Up

Starbucks Logo Change

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Free to Grow http://www.rosehavencottage.com/free-to-grow/ http://www.rosehavencottage.com/free-to-grow/#respond Tue, 05 Jul 2016 14:17:14 +0000 http://www.rosehavencottage.com/?p=3553 What’s your problem? I really want to know. That’s why I’ve created the Free to Grow project. My value is in creating solutions that help companies grow. For a limited time, take advantage of my expertise for free. Here’s some examples of how I can help: Review your existing branding, advertising, or marketing materials. Critique […]

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What’s your problem? I really want to know. That’s why I’ve created the Free to Grow project. My value is in creating solutions that help companies grow. For a limited time, take advantage of my expertise for free.

Here’s some examples of how I can help:

  • Review your existing branding, advertising, or marketing materials.
  • Critique product packaging
  • Compare your positioning with competitors.
  • Suggest improvements to your website UI (user interface) or UX (user experience)
  • Discuss new marketing opportunities

I’ve worked in entertainment, healthcare, hospitality, fashion, safety and beverages. Some clients are small local businesses. Others are international corporations. Benefit from my experience or challenge me with something new. It’s this simple.

  1. Tell me about your company.
  2. Tell me about your market.
  3. Tell me about your challenge.
  4. Ask me what I think.

It’ll cost you nothing. It will be worth your time. There is no obligation. There is no catch.

How does it work?

Explain the problem you’d like me to solve. We can communicate the way that’s best for you? Choose your preferred option.

  1. Send me a message. Describe your design challenge in the form below.
  2. Talk to me. Schedule a 15 minute call.
  3. Let’s meet. Make a 30 minute appointment anywhere in the Greater Toronto Area.

Let’s get started. Tell me which of the options above you prefer.

Error: Please check your entries!

Note: The free solutions are for consulting services only and do not include design.

 

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Logos of the Top 100 Companies http://www.rosehavencottage.com/logos-top-100-companies/ http://www.rosehavencottage.com/logos-top-100-companies/#comments Mon, 13 Jun 2016 19:45:11 +0000 http://www.rosehavencottage.com/?p=3520 Is there a correlation between excellence in brand identity and corporate performance? The answer is yes…and no. A review of the logos representing Fortune’s top 100 companies reveals the good, the bad and the ugly in corporate branding. Yes, Apple and Nike are there. Alongside some decent identities from companies you may not have heard […]

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Top-100-Companies-Brand-Identities

Is there a correlation between excellence in brand identity and corporate performance? The answer is yes…and no. A review of the logos representing Fortune’s top 100 companies reveals the good, the bad and the ugly in corporate branding. Yes, Apple and Nike are there. Alongside some decent identities from companies you may not have heard of and pathetic ones from very familiar brands.

There’s a tangential reason I did this research. A branding agency whose work in defining brands I admire, published a link bait post that pushed my designer buttons exactly as they intended. “Logos are a waste of space.” What? Seriously? Their explanation was that they only designed wordmarks. To support their position, they reported that over 60 of Fortune’s top 100 companies used wordmarks. As is the case with most statistics, it’s skewed to their perspective.

How do you define a wordmark versus a logo. Simple, right? Coca Cola has a wordmark. Nike has a logo. But what about Walmart? It has both. How do you define identities based on initials—GE, IBM, AT&T? Is Home Depot a logo or a wordmark? I have no idea how the branding agency counted. I do know they used information from this 2010 infographic. The one above is based on the 2016 report.

If you’re a branding and design fanatic you’ll find this chart fascinating. So much to dissect from colours to style, typefaces, classics, rebrands, merger impacts and industry trends. Here are some of the interesting things I noted.

Great Brand Identities

The ones most often cited for excellence are on the list.

Nike FedEx and Apple logos

 

Classics

Tweaked over time but essentially original with no need to change.

Ford and GE logos

 

Memorable Wordmarks

These identities are stronger than words. Great character.

wordmark logos

 

To the Letter

There are 15 companies who abbreviate their brand names to initials in their identities. 3M took a slightly different approach and created a strong memorable brand in the process. Did you know 3M stands for Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing? I had to look that up.

Logos based on Initials

 

The Square Route

Our wordmark isn’t strong enough. I know! Let’s stick it in a square!

square-logos

 

Diminished Presence

Mergers can be brand killers. Sad to see the classic Chase logo at the tail end of JPMorganChase and NBC’s once proud peacock marginalized by Comcast.

Logos of merged companies

 

Endangered Species

Many schools no longer teach cursive writing. I love script typefaces but you have to wonder if the day is coming when a generation won’t be able to read them.

Cursive script logos

 

Tired Old Fart

If you can picture the crusty, curmudgeonly Warren Buffett, you’d have to admit this wordmark fits the company’s CEO and Chairman to a tee. There is nothing visual about this brand. It succeeds on reputation alone. Who needs kerning?

BH-Logo

 

Airline Logos

American Airlines soars above its competitors. Best representation of the eagle of any brand on the list. It perfectly ties in to flight and the most important placement of their branding—on the tail of the aircraft.

Airline Logos

 

One more thing…

Colour

Blue Blue Blue Red Red Green Others. If Henry Ford was alive today, all Ford cars would probably be blue. Ask a client for a colour preference for their logo and they will probably tell you blue. Blue dominates. Blue is safe. Blue has many positive psychological attributes. The only thing blue won’t help your brand do is stand out.

There are many instances in this collection of brands whose great visual identities contribute to strong positive impressions and their overall success as companies. But clearly, it isn’t always the case. Still, you have to wonder why a top five company wouldn’t invest a little more in their brand.

Any other observations? Favourites? Surprises? Let me know in the comments.

See the update.

Related:

The Square Route of a Logo

Branding as the Marketing Strategy

When Brands Grow Up

Starbucks Logo Change

 

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Branding as the Marketing Strategy http://www.rosehavencottage.com/branding-marketing-strategy/ http://www.rosehavencottage.com/branding-marketing-strategy/#respond Thu, 19 May 2016 19:06:39 +0000 http://www.rosehavencottage.com/?p=3447 From the beginning, the branding for Talk About Speakers was imagined as part of the marketing strategy. One of several company names under consideration for this new speakers bureau, you might say this one spoke to us. But we still had to sell it. Not every presentation you do will happen in a boardroom with […]

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From the beginning, the branding for Talk About Speakers was imagined as part of the marketing strategy. One of several company names under consideration for this new speakers bureau, you might say this one spoke to us. But we still had to sell it.

Not every presentation you do will happen in a boardroom with great tech support. Sometimes your show’n tell gets presented across a desk in a private office or in this case, across a table in a public space. The usual presenting devices were considered—laptop, iPad—but that could still attract unwanted attention to a confidential subject. The solution was to go low tech—flash cards. That brought a smile and points scored for thinking outside the screen. Here’s the simple presentation that launched the brand strategy.

 

 

Having established the company name, work started on the visual brand identity. This is always an exhaustive undertaking. Research establishes the character of the market, the approach of competitors and possibilities for positioning this brand in a fresh, unique way.

Design is a process. Sketches and doodles evolve to finished renderings. Dozens of them as you can see in the video below. Many of the designs would work for a speakers bureau but one we thought offered opportunity for marketing beyond the mark. We shortlisted five of the best prospects and sent a package to stakeholders for rating and comments. The preferred design scored well and those rating it best did so enthusiastically.

 

 

The red lips design is not so much a logo as it is an element of the brand identity. It is a tool to be used in many ways, freely disassociated from the brand name as a standalone element or in combination with other messages. It functions as an arrow for navigation and points to focus attention. In some instances, it can be reflected.

 

Talk About Speakers branding image

We’re really just getting started with the marketing rollout but this identity has incredible potential. The brand name and visual identity are powerful tools. The business of speakers bureaus is all about talk. Many professional speakers now refer to their presentations as a talk. We are using the word talk creatively and extensively. In visual messaging, words are spoken by the lip symbol. When a sales conversation gets down to business it’s time to say, “Let’s talk about speakers.” It’s a clever way to keep the company name top-of-mind.

 

 

We sold the name Talk About Speakers with the concept that every piece of communication would build the brand. It is the focus of the marketing strategy and sales message. Talk About Speakers: Speakers your audience will talk about. The brand identity is the message.

 

Image of Talk About Speakers branding

 

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2015 Project Review Showreel http://www.rosehavencottage.com/2015-project-review/ http://www.rosehavencottage.com/2015-project-review/#respond Mon, 25 Jan 2016 22:48:30 +0000 http://www.rosehavencottage.com/?p=3397 A collection of projects from 2015. Got a minute? Check it out.

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A collection of projects from 2015. Got a minute? Check it out.

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Holiday Advertising http://www.rosehavencottage.com/holiday-advertising-part-1/ http://www.rosehavencottage.com/holiday-advertising-part-1/#respond Wed, 16 Dec 2015 19:01:21 +0000 http://www.rosehavencottage.com/?p=3386 Advertising reaches peak saturation during the holiday season. Every brand pushing every product imaginable, assaulting the consumer psyche at every turn. Indoor, outdoor, in all media and in every digital crevice. How do you make your message stand out? Solve a Problem Holiday shopping can be a stressful exercise for consumers. While gifts for close […]

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Advertising reaches peak saturation during the holiday season. Every brand pushing every product imaginable, assaulting the consumer psyche at every turn. Indoor, outdoor, in all media and in every digital crevice. How do you make your message stand out?

Solve a Problem

Holiday shopping can be a stressful exercise for consumers. While gifts for close family members and friends may be easy to find, there are always the difficult people on everyone’s list that bewilder the buyer. These also tend to be left to the last minute. And let’s face it. The solution often comes in a bottle. But which to choose?
In the Amaretto ad above, this almond-based liqueur acknowledges the “tough nut” on the consumer’s list and presents itself as the solution. Nut cracked.

Connect Emotionally

Speaking of nuts, the nutcracker is a cherished image of holiday pageantry. It also makes for the perfect holiday brand representative for the almond liqueur. In an adscape of bland snowflakes and frivolous ribbons, the striking image of the nutcracker stands out.

Red Knot Shiraz Holiday Wine AdThis ad for Red Knot wine connects in a different way. Yes, the tagline is set against a familiar holiday image, the white (fake) fur cuffed red velvet stocking but the message appeals to the self indulgence that tempts many when shopping for others. Ever picked up a little something for yourself? Guilty here. But, “It was on sale!”

Conquer the Clutter

Outdoor advertising offers some great opportunities to separate your message from the media onslaught. The Nutcracker billboard is positioned beside an expressway. While there are several along the route, they are well-spaced. During rush hour, when rushing is impossible and traffic crawls out of the city, you have a nearly captive audience. With nothing to look at, the billboards offer a break in the visual monotony.

New advertising opportunities continue to grow. From grocery carts to washroom stalls, eyeballs follow advertising. The Red Knot ad wasn’t placed in a magazine or on a website. It appeared on the side and back of a truck. The truck, with digital video panels mounted on the box travels through the city, moving around and occasionally stuck in traffic. Mobile outdoor in targeted locations.

Every brand needs to compete for holiday attention. The winners are those who can differentiate there message and connect with consumers. Be thoughtful. The holiday season offers a plethora of imagery and stories to help you solve your customer’s problem, connect with them emotionally and stand out in the crowd.

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